Upcoming Events
  1. Consumer training workshops

    July 17 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
  2. Conducting systematic reviews: A short course for thoracic oncology nurses

    August 5 @ 6:30 pm
  3. 6th ALTG Lung Cancer Preceptorship

    October 23 @ 10:00 am - October 24 @ 3:30 pm
  4. ALTG open MAC and SAC meetings

    November 20

Thoracic oncology highlights from ASCO2020 webinar- recording and evaluation survey

Please fill in the evaluation survey if you have not already done so by clicking on the survey icon at the base of your webinar console.

Please access the recording and evaluation survey here

ALTG awarded $12 million in funding

The ALTG is pleased to announce over $12 million in funding has been successfully awarded to ALTG, NHMRC Clinical Trial Centre and the Australian Genomic Cancer Medicine Centre for the ASPiRATION project. In this ground-breaking precision medicine study, led by ALTG President A/Prof Nick Pavlakis and ALTG Scientific Advisory Committee Chair, Prof Ben Solomon, ASPiRATION will explore the benefit of routine comprehensive genomic profiling in 1000 newly-diagnosed metastatic, non-squamous, NSCLC patients in Australia. The enhanced genomic profiling will assist in personalising patient care by matching patients to targeted treatments as early as possible to improve patient outcomes.

Who’s Who

Emily Stone, Respiratory Medicine Representative – MAC

Please tell us a little about yourself and how you came to be involved with the ALTG

I’m a respiratory physician at St Vincents hospital in Sydney.  I started our MDT in 2006 and have developed it since then. I became involved in the ALTG through colleagues in respiratory medicine and oncology from around Australia.

What is it about being a member of the MAC that you find most interesting?

It gives me an opportunity to share ideas and views with clinicians and researchers from around the country and gives me insight into the full range of issues that are important for lung cancer patients.  It also gives me contacts across a range of areas of expertise something that has helped me in both clinical medicine and in research.

How would you like to see the ALTG develop over time?

I see the ALTG developing its leadership role in clinical lung cancer research so that new and established researchers can turn to the ALTG for a range of resources – access to colleagues, mentorship and advice and research opportunities.

 

Anna Nowak, Mesothelioma SAC Subgroup Co-Chair

Please tell us a little about yourself and how you came to be involved with the ALTG

I was an inaugural member of the ALTG, which was formed at a meeting in Sydney whilst I was a postdoctoral fellow at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre. From memory Martin Stockler carted me along to the first meeting, so I guess that was in 2003.

However I had already done a PhD in malignant mesothelioma and subsequent work on quality of life analysis and tumour measurement in this disease, so the ALTG was an obvious vehicle for future trials in this rare and relatively neglected thoracic cancer. As I have continued to work in mesothelioma in the laboratory and clinical trials, the ALTG has become an important collaborative vehicle for this work.

What is it about being a member of the SAC that you find most interesting?

Working collaboratively with colleagues to refine a clinical trial idea is the most interesting and enjoyable part of being a MAC/SAC member. One person can never think of everything important. Everyone has input into the development of a new clinical trial, the teamwork is fantastic.

How would you like to see the ALTG develop over time?

Being the co-chair of the mesothelioma subgroup, of course I’d like to see the ALTG have an open mesothelioma trial at all times. The DREAM clinical trial is the second ALTG mesothelioma trial, but we haven’t had a mesothelioma trial open through the ALTG for a few years, since the close of B2P2M2. I’d also like to see the ALTG develop more supportive care trials for thoracic cancers.