Upcoming Events
  1. ***UPDATED*** ALTG Members’ Meeting, Sydney NSW

    November 24
  2. ***UPDATED*** 2017 ALTG Lung Cancer Symposium, Sydney NSW

    November 24 @ 9:00 am - November 25 @ 5:00 pm UTC+10

Who’s Who – Introducing our Consumer Advisory Panel

Our Consumer Advisory Panel (CAP) plays a unique role in bridging the gap between the worlds of scientific research and the perspective of patients, their families and carers. We asked each of our CAP members to tell us a little about themselves and their involvement with the ALTG.

Andrew Bowen Andrew-Bowen_300px

Please tell us a little about yourself and how you came to join the ALTG.

I came to join the ALTG because my wife passed away from Lung Cancer in 2007. As a relatively young patient (36 at diagnosis) and non-smoker I felt compelled to try and make a difference for others and to help remove the stigma associated with Lung Cancer. Prior to her death I had managed to attend the Inaugural Australian Lung Cancer Conference as a consumer and hopefully paved the way for others who have followed behind me to do so. So through the interaction with many of the members of the ALTG I was asked to join as a Consumer Representative.

What is it about being a member of the CAP that you find most interesting?

I appreciate being able to put forward the perspective of the patient or carer, and most of all being heard. The medical members of the ALTG are all very focused on achieving outcomes for patients, but sometimes numbers and statistics are not that important to patients, and having clear wording that means something to them makes a difference. By contributing the patient/carer view we can achieve a balance between medical terminology and patient understanding which brings the two parties closer together.

How would you like to see the ALTG develop over time?

I would like to see the ALTG co-operate worldwide to help create a cure for Lung Cancer. By interacting worldwide we can develop bigger trials to prove greater benefits in the treatment of lung cancer.

Lillian Leigh Lillian-Leigh_300px

Please tell us a little about yourself and how you came to join the ALTG.

As a consumer and poverty lawyer (think mortgage repossessions and insurance disputes after natural disasters), I’ve spent more than a decade advocating for the disadvantaged and the “voiceless”. Having now lived with lung cancer for over a year and a half, I’ve found that lung cancer is, in many ways, one of the most “voiceless” of all cancers. So, just like many who’ve been touched by this disease, I wanted to use what little skills I have to give back to those who’ve kept me alive.

Having a rare genetic rearrangement, and being a Phase 1 participant of a clinical trial, I’m keenly aware of the importance of well-designed and conducted medical research. I stumbled upon ALTG’s website, and was intrigued. So with a sense of curiosity, I applied to be a consumer member.

What is it about being a member of the CAP that you find most interesting?

I am relatively new to the CAP, so everything I’ve encountered seems very interesting. I am pleasantly surprised and encouraged by how dedicated and passionate the members I’ve met are in lung cancer research. I also thought I was used to medical jargon having grown up in a medical family, but I wasn’t prepared for all the acronyms (even if I knew Latin or Greek I’d have no hope working them all out).

How would you like to see the ALTG develop over time?

I would like to see a more public face of the ALTG, with a greater connection to lung cancer patients and carers in Australia. To me, research brings a lot of hope, but I’ve met many people who know little and fear much when it comes to clinical trial participation. I think that the ALTG has the potential to dispel some of this fear through education to both those within the medical profession and to the public.

I also look forward to seeing the ALTG build its financial capacity to ultimately fund grants for innovative research. As we all know, lung cancer is one of the least funded in research of all cancers, in terms of dollar per death. This desperately needs to improve and I am committed to help the ALTG where I can.

Sue McCullough Sue-McCullough_300px

Please tell us a little about yourself and how you came to join the ALTG.

As a Lung Cancer consumer for over ten years, I was a member of the NSW Cancer Institute’s regular Lung Cancer Oncology Group, since its inception in 2005. At these meeting I met numerous physicians/officials involved in the treatment of Lung Cancer. It was at these meeting that I was recommended for membership of the ALTG.

What is it about being a member of the CAP that you find most interesting?

Being involved in and finding out information about the variety of research trials that may help the treatment and diagnosis of Lung Cancer in all its forms. Hopefully representing the many people I have met through my LC support group and work for them.

How would you like to see the ALTG develop over time?

Be able to improve the best treatment for people with LC as well as possibly make the Government realize the things required to provide the best quality of care and therefore life, of people with Lung Cancer. To make sure that all Lung Cancer research done in Australia, is shared and known about, so advances in treatment and diagnosis can be moved into practice as quickly as possible.

Ian Stubbin Ian-Stubbin_300px

Please tell us a little about yourself and how you came to join the ALTG.

As I had some small understanding of the area occupied by the ALTG my oncologist urged me, when I failed to die immediately from Stage 4B NSCLC, to do something useful to support clinical trials.

What is it about being a member of the CAP that you find most interesting?

Having the incentive to be at the cutting edge of science and treatment in this specialised area.  Making a difference, hopefully, to the effectiveness and utility of our trials.

How would you like to see the ALTG develop over time?

To understand much more translational research and become a world leader in its area.  It seems that the funding may come our way to do this, and we need to organise ourselves to ensure the best outcomes.

Rosemary Taylor

Please tell us a little about yourself and how you came to join the ALTG.

My background is from research and teaching at Sydney University’s Biochemistry Department many years ago. I also worked with Glaxo UK, as it was then, for a couple of years. Since leaving the workforce, I have focused my interest in understanding the mechanism of cancer and how drugs work. I have been facilitating information and support groups for about 20 years.

What is it about being a member of the CAP that you find most interesting?

Being a member of the CAP is twofold. As mentioned, I love the science behind the trials, but the best part is putting a face of a person in front of the science! Doing research, it is easy to become removed from the end point, namely making a difference to the person with lung cancer. Secondly, patients have many misconceptions about trials. Clarifying the understanding and benefits of Trials, to patients and families in the Information and Support Groups, can make a great difference to a patient’s quality and length of life.

How would you like to see the ALTG develop over time?

I would like the Trials group to thinks more laterally about what they “trial”, it doesn’t necessarily need to be just a chemical, radiotherapy etc.